north Second street

south Second street:  
  50 south Second street: The Eastonia - 4-story brick, across from the Post Office at the NE corner of Second and Ferry Streets. Built by 1914 by owner Frank M. Soule as "The Estonia". Also referred to in 1920 as the Estonia Apartments. It was acquired in mid-Century by substantial Easton landowner William Americus...click for more on 50 s. 2nd st.
Northampton St. to Church St: West Side
  201 Northampton Street: Modern Commercial Bldg.
  22-24 North Second Street: Row Houses
  26 North Second Street: Row House
Northampton St. to Church St: East Side
  169 Northampton Street: Bachmann Publick House: Perhaps the oldest stone building in Easton, restored by various groups including the Easton Heritage Alliance. One-time residence of George Taylor, signer of Declaration of Independence. (Map Reference E) Also known (at various times) as the Bachmann Tavern, Shannon's Tavern, and the Easton House Tavern. . . click for more detail.
  15 North Second Street: Dawes House - This building stands on a strip of land stretching across original town Lot Nos. 23 and 24, as surveyed by William Parsons when Easton was established in 1752. Jacob Bachmann (spelled Baughman in the deed, and elsewhere sometimes spelled Bachman) obtained a formal land patent for Lot No.24 from the Penns in 1754 for an annual quit rent of 7s., and obtained a mortgage from John Potts. Bachmann’s mortgage was foreclosed in 1761, and the tavern was purchased at a sheriff’s sale by George Taylor. Taylor was an Irish immigrant businessman who would later sign the Declaration of Independence. During George Taylor’s ownership period, the tavern was visited by various notables, including George Washington. ...more on 15 n 2nd st.
 
  • 19 North Second Street: Row House
 

21 North Second Street: George Reeder House - now housing Bloomie's florist on 1st floor, In 1873, the residence of Reuben L. Lerch was listed at 11 North 2nd Street. With the inauguration of the modern street numbering scheme in 1874, the residence (then listed to Mrs. Lerch) was assigned the address of 21 North 2nd Street. In 1880, it had become the home of G[eorge] M. Reeder, proprietor of the Easton Daily Express newspaper, and son of Governor Andrew Reeder (first Territorial Governor of Kansas). In 1992, the house was used as an exhibit for the Hugh Moore Historical Park and Museums, prepared for the Historic Easton, Inc. and Easton House Tavern Association House Tour. . . . click for more detail.

 
  • 25 North Second Street: Residence
  27 North Second Street: Sloan House - This building stands on a strip of land stretching across original town Lot Nos. 23 and 24, as surveyed by William Parsons when Easton was established in 1752. Jacob Bachmann (spelled Baughman in the deed, and elsewhere sometimes spelled Bachman) obtained a formal land patent for Lot No.24 from the Penns in 1754 for an annual quit rent of 7s., and obtained a mortgage from John Potts. Here he built the Bachmann Publick House that still stands at the NE corner of Northampton and North 2nd Streets; a 1753 date stone was found in the building. Bachmann’s mortgage was foreclosed in 1761, and the tavern was purchased at a sheriff’s sale by George Taylor. Taylor was an Irish immigrant businessman who would later sign the Declaration of Independence. During George Taylor’s ownership period, the tavern was visited by various notables, including George Washington...more about 27 n 2nd st.
Church St to Spring Garden St: West Side
32 North Second Street: Library Hall -The Easton Library Company was originally organized at a meeting in “Chippy” White’s Hotel on 14 January 1811. The meeting’s Chairman, Easton town father Samuel Sitgreaves, donated the first book, and wrote the Articles of Incorporation. The Library opened on 13 July with 94 subscribers to the Company’s stock, and it purchased 325 books, housed in the front room of Peter Miller’s private home until 1815. The library was open 2 hours per week (4 hours in winter), and a $1 fine was assessed for loaning a book to a non-subscriber. (Photo by Richard F. Hope) In 1814-15, this brick federal-style Library Hall here on North Second Street was built around an existing building donated by Samuel Sitgreaves. Exterior brick walls were incorporated into the interior of the building during this construction. The land occupied was a part of original town Lot No.71 as surveyed by William Parsons when Easton was established in 1752. *this gorgeous historic gem could be yours! ....click here for more detail.
 


34 North Second Street: Residence

36 North Second Street: Residence

40 North Second Street: Residence

42 North Second Street: Residence

  44 North Second Street: Benjamin Riegel Mansion - 3-1/2 story "Jacobean Revival style" Flemish bond brickwork building, red and blue bricks with white stone block trim; pointed façade dormer; large bay window on 2nd floor, ornate masonry trim over front door. Said (possibly incorrectly) to have been the last building designed by famed architect Stanford White. " White, the designer of the second Madison Square Garden (NY City) and other buildings, was later assassinated by a jealous husband in the Madison Square Roof Garden restaurant in 1906. Built as a retirement home in 1902 by Benjamin Riegel, the paper magnate who founded Riegelsville...click here for more detail.
 

46 North Second Street: Residence

60 North Second Street: Edward Lawall Residence - In 1880 and 1900, the home of Edwin Lawall, a hardware merchant (in 1880), a "gentleman" in 1890, and an insurance agent (in 1900)...  more detail on 60 n. 2nd street.
  62 North Second Street: Row House
  64 North Second Street: Row House
  72 North Second Street: Modern Commercial Bldg.
  204 Spring Garden Street: Bixler/Laubach Mansion - Stone house in Victorian Romanesque style. 3-story stone tower at corner, 2-1/2-story main building with square turrets (one with battlements), scalloped roof peak, dormers, and huge bow window at ground level. Fine stained glass windows. Built before 1893 and occupied by Mrs. J. Elwood (Emma) Bixler. Emma Bixler was the widow of J. Elwood Bixler (jeweler, died 1891 ), a grandson of Christian Bixler III... more detail on 204 Spring Garden.
Church St to Spring Garden St: East Side
  45 North Second Street: Wolf Bldg. and McCartney School - "School-House Hill (also known as "School Hill" ) - East of North Second Street and North of Church Street - became the site of the Easton Union Academy in 1794 - yet another Easton institution initiated by early industrialist Samuel Sitgreaves. It included on its Board such political notables as Thomas Mifflin (first post-Revolution Governor of Pennsylvania ) and Frederick Muhlenberg (first Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives ). This "Academy" was not a school in the modern sense, but instead it provided building space to teachers who wished to give private instruction to students. It also provided space for English-language church services in Easton... more detail on 45 no. 2nd st.
  73 North Second Street: Residence

75 North Second Street: Opdyke Residence - This house was built on land originally obtained from the Penn Family in 1802 by Henry Spering. In 1860, coal merchant James F. Randolph lived at 43 North 2nd Street Street (under the numbering scheme in effect at the time), which may have been this house... it is almost certain that Opdyke replaced that house (as well as another one) with his own mansion, probably in the 1890s. ...more info on 75 n 2nd.

 

  77 North Second Street: Row House

79 North Second Street: Peter Brady House - This land was originally obtained from the Penn Family in 1802 by Henry Spering. The acquisition included both Original town Lots 36 and 38, which were contiguous, and included all the property southwards essentially to the Wolf Building property today, and eastwards 230’ to include many of the small lots fronting on Spring Garden Street today. Spering’s purchase also included Original Town Lot No.63, in the middle of the block on the West side of North 2nd Street. Spering was the son of a Tory whose land was confiscated during the Revolution, but who had recovered his family fortunes and become Northampton County Sheriff from 1897-1800... more detail on 79 n 2nd st.

Spring Garden St to Bushkill St: West Side
  201 Spring Garden:   Parking Lot (formerly Fulmer-Bush Mansion) - The corner property had been the site of large stone house used initially as the German Reformed Parsonage, and (after 1816) as the home of Presbyterian Minister David Bishop. Subsequent site of the Henry Fulmer Mansion, then listed as 41 Spring Garden St. under the numbering scheme then in effect. " Fulmer was a merchant in iron and slate. This was occupied after Fulmer's death by the Bush family... more detail on 201 Spring Garden.
  118 North Second Street: Bercaw Residence - 3-story white brick, with south-facing bay window on third floor. In the 1870s and '80s, the home of Abraham Bercaw and his family. Bercaw was a partner in the liquor store in the first floor of the Masonic Hall at the corner of South Third and Ferry Streets (44 South Third St.). " In the early 1870s, the house was numbered 62 North Second Street, under the street numbering scheme then in effect. In 1900, still the home of Katherine Bercaw (apparently the merchant's widow, listed as Catherine in 1880), age 81, with two grown children... more detail on 118 no. 2nd st.
 

122-28 North Second Street: Row Houses

130 North Second Street: Row House

 

134 North Second Street: Sabrina Odenwelder House - 2-1/2 story red brick "Colonial Revival", with bay window/turret on 2nd and "3rd" floors; dormer. (Map Reference 20) Built circa 1897. In 1900 it was the home of Sabrina Odenwelder (age 61). It was later, at various times, home to Elmer Armstrong, President of Wilson Stove & Manufacturing Co.; Dr. Victor Messinger (a doctor for the public school district); and the Hriskos Family (restaurateurs). ...more detail on 134 no. Second st.
Now host to easton's beloved CASERA (cozy home-cooked) restaurant and art-gallery on the 1st floor and a goregous 5-6BR home above, this property is now offered for sale!
  202 Bushkill Street: Row House
Spring Garden St to Bushkill St: East Side

165 Spring Garden Street: Hackett Mansion - Senator William Clayton Hackett's former home. Senator Hackett donated Hackett Park to the City of Easton in 1914 in accordance with a prior (refused) offer made by his father, Joseph Hackett... The City reconsidered, and asked Senator Hackett (now his father’s heir) to renew his father’s donation offer. W. Clayton Hackett was, at various times, President of Hackett Company, Inc. (men’s clothes), Vice President of the Easton National Bank, Vice President of the Lehigh Water Co., and a Pennsylvania State Senator elected in 1914 and 1918. Hackett died in 1930, and is buried in Easton Cemetery...

 

  111 North Second Street: Michael Lehn Row House
  115 North Second Street: Grotz / George Lehn Row House
  119 North Second Street: William G. Stewart Row House
 

123 North Second Street: Clement / Charles Stewart House

  133-37 North Second Street: Site of Former John Maxwell, Laubach and John Stewart Mansions - Modern single story building. In the 1870s and '80s, a large predecessor building was the John Maxwell residence. " In the early 1870s, the building was listed as 73 North Second Street, under the street numbering scheme then in effect. In 1900 and 1910, George A. Laubach lived here, while William Laubach lived at No. 137... more detail on 133 no. 2nd st.

10.30.2013: this site is brought to you by local historian Ricard F Hope, and local realtor Ellen Shaughnessy - realSellen.com